Andersen-Tawil

Andersen-Tawil Syndrome

Anaesthesia and peri-operative care in the primary Periodic Paralysis Disorders

Adverse reactions to anaesthesia, including life-threatening events, are a serious concern for patients with Periodic Paralysis Disorders. Many of our patients report serious events associated with anesthesia and side effects which may linger for days to months.

There is rarely time for a surgical team to comb through journals and texts for the specialized knowledge needed to care for the patient with periodic paralysis.

Converting Mg of Potassium to MeQ or MmoL

 

Source: Levitt, Jacob O, Practical aspects in the management of hypokalemic periodic paralysis. Journal of Translational Medicine 2008, 6:18 doi:10.1186/1479-5876-6-18:

The Use of Bactrim in the Periodic Paralyses

The antibiotic Bactrim is well-known to produce muscle weakness, even paralysis in patients with Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis.

Patient Medical Information Template in Spanish

Our Spanish-speaking patients may access the Spanish language Medical Information Template. It is in Open Document Format, so patients can add their own information to the template. Thanks to Barbara Baker and friends for translating our Patient's Information Sheet for us.

Leaky Channels make weak muscles

Leaky channels make weak muscles: Mutations in the skeletal muscle voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV 1.1) have been associated with hypokalemic periodic paralysis, but how these mutations cause the symptoms of the disorder has always been unclear. In this article the authors describe how they used mice with the CaV 1.1 mutation  to investigate how the mutation causes the features of HypoKPP.

Starting Acetazolamide (Diamox)

Because this is a frequently asked question from patients we post here a reply:

Question:

My doctor wants to prescribe a medication called acetazolamide. Is that okay for someone with Hypokalemic periodic paralysis. When I look on the web it says this medication causes you to excrete potassium. How can that be good for me?

Answer:

New Findings Suggest Genetics Behind Drug Response

PLoS One. 2012; 7(7): e40235.
Published online 2012 July 10.

Splicing of the rSlo Gene Affects the Molecular Composition and Drug Response of Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels in Skeletal Muscle

Maria Maddalena Dinardo,#1 Giulia Camerino,#1 Antonietta Mele,1 Ramon Latorre,2 Diana Conte Camerino,1 and Domenico Tricarico1,*

Abstract

Measuring quality of life impairment in periodic paralyses


Measuring quality of life impairment in skeletal muscle channelopathies.


Eur J Neurol. 2012 May 19. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-1331.2012.03751.x. [Epub ahead of print]

Sansone VA, Ricci C, Montanari M, Apolone G, Rose M, Meola G; INQoL Group.
Source
Department of Neurology, University of Milan, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Milan, Italy.


Abstract
   Link to pdf copy of entire article 

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

The Action Potential - A Movie!

Puzzled by the terms membrane potential, sodium channel, potassium channel and sodium-potassium pump?  

This cute cartoon explains what each is and shows how the potassium and sodium channels, and the sodium potassium pump maintain muscle membrane potential.  Although this uses nerves to illustrate how the principle works, the action is the same in muscle membrane. Click here to watch.

Periodic Paralysis and the New Mother

Anticipating the Baby

 

Expectant mothers and their doctors can take the secure thought that hundreds of women with periodic paralysis have been members of our Listserv since 1995, and an overwhelming majority of them have been mothers. To date not a single one has been unable to care for her child due to her periodic paralysis.

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