Andersen-Tawil

Andersen-Tawil Syndrome

Meal Plan Template

When I'm in the middle of an abortive attack meal planning goes right out the window. I can look at a fridge and pantry full of food and not be able to figure out what to do with any of it.

The only way to avoid feeding the family cheese on toast and a glass of tap water for dinner again is advance planning.

I can follow clear and simple directions. So if I plan exactly what we will eat for each meal I can;

1) avoid wasting food,

2) feed us something other than crud on rice (which is going to make me weak anyway) and

Hospital Management Guidelines - ATS

Hospital Management Guidelines for Patients with Andersen-Tawil Syndrome

Patient's Name:

Birthdate: ________Height: _______Weight: _______

Address:

Primary Physician:

Emergency contact:  Name:                                             Relationship:

home phone#                                         cell #                            FAX:

Tracking Triggers - Food and Beverage Chart

Use this chart to help determine patterns to your food triggers. Blanks have been left for you to individualize the chart to your needs. Check food labels for sodium content, etc. This chart is intended to be utilized as an adjunct to a food journal.

Chart Comparing Periodic Paralyses

This chart allows comparison of the forms of primary periodic paralysis, symptoms, clinical and cardiac signs, effect of potassium, triggers and therapies. 

 

Comparison of Five Forms of Periodic Paralysis

Introduction:

The major features found in all the periodic paralyses are:

1. Attacks almost always begin before the age of 25, though occasionally later in life. ATS patients can develop first symptoms at any age.

2. Serum potassium fluctuates shortly before an attack, but serum potassium level will normalize before the attacks resolves and will be within the normal range between attacks. This is not a disorder of the blood but one in which there is an inappropriate shift of fluid, K+ and NA+ during attacks. 

The Potassium Draw: Special Measures

When evaluating patients for periodic paralysis it is vital to obtain accurate results from blood draws. Because potassium levels which vary only a fraction of a point may be enough to trigger weakness in some patients, the lab may need to be made aware of specialized procedures which should ideally be used to obtain samples for K+ evaluation.

From "A Manual of Laboratory Diagnostic Tests" by Frances Fischbach, Page 247-253.

Potassium (K+) Normal Values: 3.5-5.0 mmol/liter 4.0-4.7 mmol/liter (average)

Physician's Summary: Andersen-Tawil Syndrome

Andersen-Tawil Syndrome (ATS) is a genetic disorder which causes a distinctive pattern of features;

1) Episodes of muscle weakness and/or flaccid paralysis (i.e periodic paralysis)

2) Certain kinds of heart rhythm disturbances and

3) Differences in facial and body structure.

Physician's Sheet: Acetazolamide Drug Interactions

Acetazolamide (aka Diamox) is frequently prescribed as therapy for the periodic paralyses. While most patients take this drug without incident it can interact with other drugs. Physicians should be aware of potential problems which might arise.

Malignant Hyperthermia

Periodic Paralysis Patients at Increased Risk of MH

Patients with Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis and Paramyotonia Congenita are at increased risk for Malignant Hyperthermia (MH) during surgery. 

Potassium Supplementation and B-12 Deficiency

Patients who take potassium chloride long-term, i.e., are at risk for developing vitamin B-12 deficiency. Potassium supplements such as K-Dur, Micro-K, Slow-K, K-Lyte, etc. interfere with the absorption of vitamin B-12 and can eventually lead to the depletion of body stores of this crucial vitamin. 1, 2, 3

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